Gingery Stories

Mainly a Mark Gatiss and James Rhodes appreciation blog. Lots of Sherlock.

Saskia, 31, welcome

(Source: sansalayned, via iamtasos)

(Source: fabuloussubject, via iamtasos)

definitelydope:

Ammo bunkers in morning fog. Fort Ord Dunes State Beach, CA (by m. wriston)

(via corneliapornelia)

xxxxxx6x:

ASK31:Holmes brother’s daily life.
Totally boring…

xxxxxx6x:

ASK31:Holmes brother’s daily life.

Totally boring…

(via notfspurejam)

amygloriouspond:

∞ Scenes of Sherlock

I honestly think I had dinner… with a ghost.

(via littlemisshamish)

enchantedsleeper:

Game of Thrones Characters in Art

(via reereek)

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

imgfave:

Posted by WALLQ

imgfave:

Posted by WALLQ

(via deathandfairytales)

johnsfez:

2/41 of Granada Holmes ↪ The Dancing Men

johnsfez:

2/41 of Granada Holmes
 ↪ The Dancing Men

(via granadabrettishholmes)

todaysdocument:

It’s April 15 - Are Your Taxes Done?

State-of-the-art systems at internalrevenueservice are waiting to process your returns!

While punch cards and tape drives seem archaic now, they were a “new dimension” in data processing and tax administration at the time of this IRS educational film, “Right on the Button,” from the late 1960s. 

Excerpted from “Right on the Button." From the series: Motion Picture Films, ca. 1960 - ca. 1970. Records of the Internal Revenue Service, 1791 - 2006.

Now, go finish those taxes!

(via smithsonianlibraries)

idrillia:

rehfan:

Oh that laugh!

He genuinely seems to hold a lot of joy and delight in life. I need to channel more Whishaw.

idrillia:

rehfan:

Oh that laugh!

He genuinely seems to hold a lot of joy and delight in life. I need to channel more Whishaw.

(Source: chaseangela, via trashyfiction)